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Posts Tagged ‘communications’

Do Impossible Things as a Team

February 9, 2011 Leave a comment

Will.i.Am on team collaboration tool Chatter.com and how their mega Super Bowl project “got done” in the cloud…

 

 

 

What Not to do in a Pizza Turnaround

February 15, 2010 Leave a comment

Domino’s Pizza recently launched a new ad campaign called the Pizza Turnaround. The message features Domino’s focus group testing where customers point out why the company’s pizza downright sucks. Domino’s goes on to show us how they plan to re-invent their pizza, making it better and tastier than ever. Pretty bold move, but a great idea… right?

One (small) problem: The Pizza Turnaround was marketed in the U.S. only.

One VERY BIG problem: Canadian television viewers saw the ad! What do you think Canadians will think when they call their local Domino’s and find out they are about to order the same sucky pizza that wasn’t good enough for our U.S. neighbors? (That’s exactly what happened when I called Domino’s in Montreal, Quebec on Super Bowl Weekend.)

Life at the Speed of Google

February 8, 2010 Leave a comment

Super Bowl ads this year were “O-K”… with a few exceptions, most notably (in my humble opinion) was Google’s “Parisian Love”.

The spot does it all: showcases the product, demonstrates how the brand is cultural staple in our everyday lives and tells a great story. Bravo!

Click here for Time’s full list of this year’s BEST and WORST super bowl commercials.

Will NBC get Late Night Right?

January 26, 2010 Leave a comment

Last week, the world watched as NBC’s late night fiasco turned a page. Conan is out, Jay is back and I think NBC redefined the term “between a rock and a hard place”. Hopefully the NBC media research group adjusted the projections methodology they used to estimate its Late Night lineup for Vancouver 2010 Olympics.

But did NBC get this right? Will Jay Leno deliver better performance and ratings than Conan O’Brien would have in the same time slot? My guess: No.

Conan’s audience was significantly younger than Jay’s audience. Younger audiences consume more media from more devices (through TV, TiVo, on the internet, mobile phones, Kindles, Tablets and more). By going with Jay Leno, NBC sticks with what they know works – broadcast television and conventional business thinking. But in just 5 years from now, the Late Show will probably be available on any and every screen (or device) you can think of. Conan’s younger audiences would have used their iPhones to watch more NBC content, Blackberries to download more NBC downloads and any other device to simply connect more to the NBC brand than compared to Jay’s older, more broadcast-based audience.

The TV viewing experience has moved to the web and ratings on television are no longer an adequate measure of performance. New media and new devices have changed all that. Just this week, Variety reported on Nielson’s plan to finally combine online and television video ratings in a single “extended screen” rating system. I wonder if this type of metric was even a consideration for NBC when they broke Conan’s contract two weeks ago.

What do you think? Is NBC’s decision going to pay off? Feel free to drop your comments about online television too…

Live Broadcast of Grey Cup Parade – sponsored by H Gregoire & Rona

December 1, 2009 Leave a comment

The Alouettes are 2009 Grey Cup Champions. On Weds, Dec 2 the city of Montreal will celebrate and Global Montreal will be there to catch all the action live on television and the web. 

H Gregoire & Rona present live coverage of the Grey Cup Victory Parade in downtown Montreal (Weds Dec 2, 11h30 – 13h30 on Global Montreal – Videotron 008, Bell TV 234)

HTC’s “You Campaign”

November 16, 2009 Leave a comment

I’ve probably seen this spot 20 times or so and it still gives me the shivers. I think it’s perfect: the music, text, copy, VO, everything…. “You don’t need to get a phone. You need a phone that gets you.” Brilliant!

This is HTC’s latest commercial from the You campaign.

 

 

 

We Can All Learn Something from iTunes

May 29, 2009 Leave a comment

On Thursday (May 28, 2009), American networks like ABC, Fox, NBC and WB made 20 of their TV series available on the iTunes Canada store. Now Canadians can download favorites like Grey’s Anatomy, House and many more for $2.50 – $3.50 per ep. This is great news for Canada because U.S. based websites like ABC.com or Hulu.com are not allowed to serve their free video content to Canadians (as part of their contractual content distribution rights).

FACT: Canada has the highest online video penetration of the five countries comScore tracks (Canada 88%, France 82%, Germany 82%, U.K. 81%, U.S. 76%).

Think of the one or two early adopters you probably know who like to show off their media servers and web connected home theatre systems whenever you come over for a visit. I don’t think anyone can dispute the fact that we will, in the very near future begin to see mass acceptance of web enabled television. This is when viewers will actually be able to interact with broadcast and advertising content via the internet on a single screen, in the comfort of their living room. To put it all in context: You (yes you!) will be able to sit down in your living room, turn on your TV, visit the iTunes Canada store to download The Office in hi-def, store the episode on your hard drive and watch it whenever you are ready, in Dolby 5.1 surround sounds (of course). This is happening now and will acceptance will continue to accelerate.

I think that Canadian cable companies resisting broadcasters’ requests for ‘fee-for-carriage’ can learn a thing or two from iTunes and the inevitable world of web enabled television. In an industry where audiences are becoming increasingly empowered to get what they want, distributors have a responsibility to cooperate so that everyone wins. If ABC is able to cooperate with iTunes in terms of distributing Grey’s Anatomy, why isn’t it working for CTV and Shaw or Global and Videotron?

What do you think? Leave your comments here.